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December 13th, 2016
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By Jean-Paul Rodrigue Conventionally, ports and airports are not considered to be integrated since they service different supply chains, namely high value goods for air transport and bulk commodities for maritime transport. Maritime and air cargo were typically incompatible, implying that port and airport operations were planned separately. Their location only coincided because they both service large metropolitan markets and need to be well connected to road transport systems. While this assertion is still valid, several changes took...
December 13th, 2016
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European ports policy update: On Monday, December 12th, the plenary session of the European Parliament discussed the report of MEP Knut Fleckenstein on the Port Regulation. The report follows extensive negotiations between the European Parliament and representatives of the European  Council and the Commission over a policy initiative that had been published by the European Commission in 2013. Last March, the European Parliament voted in favour of a revised EU Ports Services Regulation (PSR) aiming to make European ports more...
December 9th, 2016
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Investments in infrastructure outside the EU and its impact on trade flows and existing capacities; the strengths and weaknesses of the existing EU infrastructure network; opportunities deriving from connections to non-EU networks; EU requests from neighbouring and non-EU countries before committing to common projects; and the impact of One-Belt-One-Road (OBOR) on the existing TEN-T network, were all among the issues that PortEconomics co-director Theo Notteboom put forward during his keynote speech at the Second Annual...
November 24th, 2016
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By Thanos Pallis Cruise ports in the Mediterranean and its adjoining seas continue to adapt to new levels of demand, hosting bigger cruise vessels and seeking ways to accompany the contribution of cruising to port-cities and local communities with positive experiences for all their users. Celebrating 20 years of MedCruise surveyed the practices applied by MedCruise port members to further advance their cruise businesses. As detailed in the celebratory publication ‘Ports Together’, these strategies are associated extensively with...
November 17th, 2016
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By Peter de Langen It is increasingly understood that ports are spatial clusters of interrelated economic activities, such as chemical plants, energy plants, construction plants (for instance for components of offshore wind installations), warehouses, and terminals as well as a variety of business services Huge synergies arise from the co-location of such interrelated companies in ports areas. Many of these benefits arise ‘spontaneously’, for example, the Siemens plant for blades in the port of Hull will use port facilities for receiving...
November 16th, 2016
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Over the last decade, insights from the strategic management discipline have increasingly been applied to ports. A review of literature shows that in the analysis of port authority strategy mainly outside-in approaches are applied. The latest port study of PortEconomics members Larissa van der Lugt and Peter de Langen along with Lorike Hagdorn (VU Amsterdam) adds to the emerging understanding of the port authority’s strategy by applying a cognitive perspective. Specifically, the strategic cognition of firms’ executives is one of the...
November 13th, 2016
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By Peter de Langen Should port development differ between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas? Some of the largest ports in the world are located in metropolitan areas, and quite often in central locations - think Barcelona, New York and Amsterdam – while others are located outside cities, such as Le Havre, Charleston, Richard’s Bay and Algeciras. The pressure on land use is often high in metropolitan ports, with retail, housing or leisure, among others, clambering for use of the land. From a public interest and policy...
November 9th, 2016
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UNCTAD published today the 2016 edition of Review of Maritime Transport, a recurrent publication prepared by the UNCTAD secretariat since 1968 with the aim of fostering the transparency of maritime markets and analysing relevant developments. In one of  its sections – Chapter 4, Review of Maritime Transport 2016 sets out to describe the work of UNCTAD in helping developing countries improve port performance in order to lower transport costs and achieve better integration into global trade. The Review explores new datasets in port...
November 9th, 2016
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By Jan Hoffman The UNCTAD Review of Maritime Transport 2016 has been launched this week. This year, we have placed a special focus on “Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Countries”. Here are a few selected personal picks: Demand We have a new geography of trade, which can be depicted quite nicely with our data on seaborne trade. Developing countries are no longer just the suppliers of high volume/ low value raw materials, but instead now also import large volumes of oil, iron ore, coal et al, participating in global...
November 1st, 2016
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By Theo Notteboom Since 2015 four alliances are operational in the container shipping market: 2M, Ocean Three, CKY(H)E and G6. The merger of China Shipping and Cosco to form China Cosco Container Lines (COSCOCS) and the acquisition of APL/NOL by CMA CGM were the first major market changes signalling major changes in the current alliance structure. By Q2 of 2017, the new alliance landscape would include the 2M alliance and two new large-scale alliances, i.e. the Ocean Alliance and THE Alliance. In the past few months the container...
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