PortStudies

October 20th, 2017
PortStudies

Aiming to effectively respond to calls for upgrading cruise terminals, while safeguarding public spending, port authorities started to seek the active involvement of third parties to finance, construct, operate, and/or commercially develop cruise facilities. Specialized cruise terminals replace multi-purpose or temporary docking facilities. New cruise terminals are built and existing ones are upsized and upgraded, imposing additional investments on the hosting ports. In their award winning paper (Winner of “Best Conference Paper”,...
August 28th, 2017
PortStudies

PortEconomics celebrates the publication of PortReport No 2 - the second of the PortEconomics Discussion Reports series - with a study by PortEconomics member Ricardo Sanchez discussing the evolution of the Caribbean container port market over the last two decades. The Caribbean, also known as the Mar de las Antillas, is an area of 2.7 million km². It is easy to see the importance of its size by comparing it with other similar seas such as the Mediterranean (2.5 million km²), the North Sea (650 thousand km²), or the Baltic (420...
August 28th, 2017
PortStudies

In 1992, UNCTAD outlined a three-generation model to classify different stages that the port industry has experienced. It illustrates that port evolution is not a linear progress but periodically with key events to re-start every stage. An important research question emerges on whether the port industry has involved to the new generation or not after more than two decades of development. To provide useful insight into this research question, PortEconomics member Adolf Ng along with Kennth H. Wong (Hutchison Port Holdings, Hong Kong,...
August 11th, 2017
PortStudies

Using a game theory approach, the latest port study of PortEconomics co-director Theo Notteboom and Cui Han (University of Antwerp, Belgium) analyses a situation in which the government imposes a certain emission tax on vessels and port operations for emission control in port areas. Two ports are considered: a purely private port and a landlord (partial public) port. These two ports are in Cournot or Bertrand competition or cooperation with differentiated service. The authors' model outcomes lead to the following conclusions. First, the...
August 1st, 2017
PortStudies

The rapid growth of the cruise industry since the beginning of the ‘90 has stimulated the ongoing debate on its positive and negative impacts at economic, social and environmental level. Under multiple stakeholder pressure, leading international cruise companies have re-shape their communication strategies by fostering their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) attitude to successfully manage stakeholders and support their corporate strategies. Grounding on stakeholder theory and legitimacy theory, the paper addresses cruise lines’ CSR...
July 31st, 2017
PortStudies

Celebrating 25 years since the establishment of the Association, the International Association of Maritime Economists (IAME) Annual Conference organised a special opening session to discuss the future of maritime and port economics. PortEconomics co-director Thanos Pallis presented a call for a more measured pace port studies development and dissemination. PortEconomics invites its readers to follow the link in order to download the call – and, not least, to apply the concept: Pallis A.A. (2017): Slow port studies. IAME 2017, Kyoto,...
July 24th, 2017
PortStudies

In the context of increased scale of carriers and vessel sizes, stakeholder opposition to port expansion, and heavy regulation, ports prepare their strategic response. A port’s competitive strength strongly depends on its capability of developing competitive advantages. Ports consider options such as strategic partnership(s), or any form of collaboration, which could lead to more or alternative combinations of unique resources as sources of competitive advantage. Taking an extended resource base perspective, the competitive advantages of the...
July 11th, 2017
PortStudies

The concept of resilience in seaport-related research is the subject of the PortEconomics members Theo Notteboom, Michael Dooms and Indra Vonck new port study. The authors build upon the notion of resilience based on the literature and construct an integrated framework of port resilience encompassing all layers of port activities. Resilience is the science of preparing for, dealing with, and recuperating from shocks. Recent highly disruptive natural and man made events have shown the social costs of seaport failures. Three propositions are...
July 5th, 2017
PortStudies

PortEconomics members Thanos Pallis, Francesco Parola, Giovanni Satta, and Theo Notteboom study on private entry and emerging partnerships in cruise terminals operations in cruise ports in the Mediterranean and its adjoining seas has won the Maritime Economics and Logistics (MEL) Best paper award at the Annual Conference of the International Association of Maritime Economists (IAME), that was held in Kyoto Japan. The study which will be soon published in the scholarly journal Maritime Economics and Logistics (MEL) details the entry...
June 20th, 2017
PortStudies

Market players active in the port industry deploy a range of financial sources to meet the growing investment requirements in port infrastructure and to fund their (overseas) expansion strategies. Recent empirical evidence shows that equity capital markets are expected to extend their role in this regard. The latest port study of PortEconomics members Theo Notteboom, Francesco Parola and Giovanni Satta, along with Luca Persico (University of Genoa) deals with the long-term performance of IPOs in the seaport industry as a strategic...
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