Presentations

April 18th, 2017
Presentations

By Theo Notteboom The Straits of Gibraltar is one of the most strategic points on East-West maritime trade lanes. Ports in the wider region around the Straits have good reasons to convince shipping lines of making a call at their container terminal facilities for transhipment and interlining purposes. The container volumes in the region grew from 660,000 TEU in 1985 to 14.01 million TEU in 2016. Algericas was the first to reap the benefits of its geographical location. Algericas at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula was the...
April 12th, 2017
Presentations

The PORTOPIA project has entered its last year. This is a good time to make up a balance and to look into the future of the project. Therefore, we organised an interview with Isabelle Ryckbost, Secretary General of ESPO, and Michael Dooms, the PORTOPIA project coordinator. 1. What are the main achievements of the PORTOPIA project so far? “Obviously a 4-year project with a large budget has many achievements to highlight,” starts Michael Dooms. “If I were to pick the main one,” he continues, “it would be the fact that we have...
March 26th, 2017
Presentations

By Theo Notteboom The cargo volume handled remains a key performance indicator for ports. While also other indicators related to logistics performance, sustainability, innovation and economic impact are gaining ground, it remains relevant to observe how cargo volumes have evolved over time. The table shows the top 15 container ports in the European Union in 2016 based on container throughput expressed in TEU. It also includes container growth figures compared to 2015 and pre-crisis year 2007. The listed ports all handle more than 1.5...
March 3rd, 2017
Presentations

By Theo Notteboom Shanghai was a latecomer in the container business: its first container terminal was opened in 1983 The Portgraphic shows Shanghai’s year-on-year growth in container throughput compared to the top three container ports in Europe (i.e. Rotterdam, Antwerp and Hamburg) and the top three container ports in North America (i.e. Los Angeles, Long Beach and New York/New Jersey).The period of observation starts in 1986. The top three European ports started to receive containers shortly after the launch of the first...
February 14th, 2017
Presentations

By Theo Notteboom Belgian and Dutch container ports are part of the Rhine-Scheldt Delta, the largest container port region in Europe in volume terms. Dutch and Belgian ports together handled 23.9 million TEU in 2016 or 1.55% more than in 2015. Rotterdam continues to dominate the Dutch container port system handling 12.38 million TEU in 2016, a small increase of 1.2% compared to 2015. Rotterdam represents 99.5% of all container volumes handled in Dutch ports. Its lowest share ever was recorded in 2006 (i.e. 96%) when the port of Amsterdam...
February 4th, 2017
Presentations

The PortEconomics team had the privilege to provide a customised edition of its flagship PortExecutive Seminar, this time in Panama, with the program attended by the personnel of the Panama Canal Authority The 6th edition of the PortExecutive Seminar focused on business development for ports, and related industrial and logistics complexes. Specific attention was given on issues as drivers of change, the use of concessions, stakeholder management and business development capabilities. The  program included various interactive...
December 29th, 2016
Presentations

PortEconomics is celebrating the ending of 2016 recapping the articles that have captured the interest of the visitors of our web initiative so far for 2016. Our most popular papers on Cruise ports in 2016 were: 1. Mediterranean cruise ports: traffic growth continues A 5,62% increase of passenger movements comparing to 2014 was registered in Mediterranean cruise ports in 2015. The variation of cruise passenger movements in the second biggest cruise region of the world is positive when one relates the numbers with the one that had taken...
December 29th, 2016
Presentations

PortEconomics is celebrating the ending of 2016 recapping the articles that have captured the interest of the visitors of our web initiative so far for 2016. Our most popular papers on Shipping in 2016 were: 1. The Hanjin shipping bankruptcy: how big of an impact? For many years, the shipping industry has been in a situation of overcapacity, which was depressing rates and impairing the profitability of shipping lines, writes PortEconomics member Jean-Paul Rodrigue. To make matters worse, almost every major shipping line was ordering...
December 13th, 2016
Presentations

By Jean-Paul Rodrigue Conventionally, ports and airports are not considered to be integrated since they service different supply chains, namely high value goods for air transport and bulk commodities for maritime transport. Maritime and air cargo were typically incompatible, implying that port and airport operations were planned separately. Their location only coincided because they both service large metropolitan markets and need to be well connected to road transport systems. While this assertion is still valid, several changes took...
December 9th, 2016
Presentations

Investments in infrastructure outside the EU and its impact on trade flows and existing capacities; the strengths and weaknesses of the existing EU infrastructure network; opportunities deriving from connections to non-EU networks; EU requests from neighbouring and non-EU countries before committing to common projects; and the impact of One-Belt-One-Road (OBOR) on the existing TEN-T network, were all among the issues that PortEconomics co-director Theo Notteboom put forward during his keynote speech at the Second Annual...
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