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March 28th, 2021
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The Italian government has announced that cruise ships will no longer be allowed to sail near the historic center of Venice. Large passenger boats must now dock at the city's mainland industrial port at Marghera, in a move made to "protect a historical and cultural heritage not only of Italy but of the whole world". Like any other economic activity, is also associated with externalities raising social, economic, and environmental questions and challenges for cruise port and the surrounding areas. PortEconomics members Thanos...
March 2nd, 2021
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by Theo Notteboom Port performance measurement covers a wide array of key performance indicators (KPIs) related to supply chain performance, productivity, connectivity, sustainability/energy transition, corporate social responsibility (CSR), financial performance, customer satisfaction, innovation and economic impact. Still, it remains relevant to observe how cargo volumes have evolved over time, as cargo flows and related activities remain the bread and butter of port authorities and terminal operators. The table shows the 2020 container...
March 1st, 2021
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Download GREPORT 2020 here GREPORT2020, the third edition of the biannual report on Greek ports is now available to be freely downloaded via PortEconomics. The report contains sections on Latest developments in Greek port policyCargo throughput trendsPassenger movementsFinancial standing of Greek portsDevelopments per port The third edition of the flagship report for Greek ports contains an additional section "Focus" containing a review of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Greek port system and the evolution of Greek...
February 27th, 2021
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About two weeks ago, the port authorities of Antwerp and Zeebrugge in Belgium announced they are starting the process towards a full merger. The new merged entity will bear the name "Port of Antwerp-Bruges". Theo Nottteboom, PortEconomics co-director, comments "While the transition to a low-carbon port is high on the agenda, the merger will also create a large container port complex combining the large upstream facilities of Antwerp with coastal container terminals in Zeebrugge. Combined these terminals handled about 13.8 million TEU...
January 13th, 2021
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KEDGE Business School seeks to fill a PhD position for its Centre of Excellence in Supply Chain (CESIT). The selected candidate will perform an economic and political analysis of the implementation of Emission Control Areas (ECAs), focusing on French ports and the Mediterranean Sea.  KEDGE Business School is a vibrant business school with four campuses in France (Paris, Bordeaux, Marseille and Toulon), two in China (Shanghai and Suzhou) and one in Africa (Dakar). KEDGE Business School offers an international environment,...
January 5th, 2021
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In their latest port study, PortEconomics members Theo Notteboom, Thanos Pallis and Jean-Paul Rodrigue investigate the temporal and spatial sequences of the supply and demand shocks of COVID-19 on container ports and the container shipping industry by comparing these events to the 2008-2009 financial crisis. Economic shocks test the resilience and adaptability of the shipping industry and container ports. Each crisis triggers different ramifications in the container market. Using operational and financial data from primary and secondary...
December 30th, 2020
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By Ricardo J. Sánchez and Eliana Barleta The sudden and prolonged action of COVID-19 on health, living conditions and the world economy, among others, has been of great magnitude until now, being characterized by four fundamental elements: the pre-existence of adverse conditions, the extent of the effects, the speed of the impact and finally, its intensity.  Similarly, international maritime trade, throughout the world, has had notorious effects. The falls worldwide in container traffic were particularly marked in the months of April...
December 4th, 2020
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The reduction of Greenhouse gasses (GHG) and other air emissions represents a major challenge for ports. Ports so far have only taken limited steps to this end, but there are large differences between ports. PortEconomics members Henrik Sornn Friese, Peter de Langen, and co-authors René Taudal Poulsen and Agnieszka Urszula Nowinska, published their latest port study on the efforts of ports to reduce air emissions. The study examines the drivers for the adoption of air emissions abatement measures in a sample of 93 of the...
December 2nd, 2020
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Recent decades have brought a growing commitment of investors in the (co-)funding and management of inland terminals, particularly container terminals. However, the actors involved, the forms of third-party entry, and the emerging partnerships in inland terminals have only been investigated on a fragmented basis in inland port research. In a new port study, PortEconomics co-director Theo Notteboom and co-researchers Dong Yang, and Xin Zhou, analyse entry strategies of actors in inland container terminals on the Rhine and Yangtze in terms...
November 19th, 2020
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Call for papers for a special issue of Maritime Economics & Logistics Disruptions caused by economic shocks test the resilience and adaptability of shipping, ports, and related supply chains. Unexpected events spanning economic crises, political events, natural disasters, cybersecurity incidents, and health crises, challenge the integrity and the well-functioning of shipping, ports, and terminals, and multiply the risks across extended supply chains. The disruptions caused by either external or internal shocks put pressure on the...
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