PortStudies

February 10th, 2022
PortStudies

Chinese enterprises have invested in more than 100 overseas ports globally in the past two decades, but their contribution to the local terminal's competitiveness remains unclear. Differing from the existing qualitative geopolitical interpretation of China-labeled port projects, this study empirically investigates how investor attributes with Chinese characteristics affect the throughput evolution and market shares of the respective container terminals. PortEconomics member Theo Notteboom, along with Dong Yang, and Lu Li,  focus in...
February 8th, 2022
PortStudies

 A cruise-port destination is a bundle of tangible and intangible assets which transform a port into a cruise destination. Tangible assets include cruise terminal facilities, infrastructures and sovrastructures which make destinations accessible for both cruise ships (sea-side) and cruise tourists (land-side). Besides, the natural heritage (e.g., flora, fauna, beaches, seas, hills and mountains), as well as man-made constructions (e.g., buildings, roads, museums, theatres, and markets) and other typical cultural highlights constitute...
January 27th, 2022
PortStudies

In the 1990s European Union embarked on the development of a European Port Policy. Three decades later, and despite the difficulties observed along the road, progress has been achieved on certain fronts. In their latest port study, PortEconomics member Thanos Pallis and Costas Chlomoudis (University of Piraeus, Greece) examine this evolution in parallel with the analysis of the eventful Greek port policy. The analysis covers the last four decades and reveals that successive governments opted to deviate with the European...
January 10th, 2022
PortStudies

Port managing bodies (PMBs) need to respond to increased societal pressures for improving environmental performance. For many PMBs, a modal shift (MS) from road to rail and barge transport (where available) represents a strategic priority. Yet, in practice, few PMBs have set clear MS targets or have been able to achieve their MS objectives at the level of the port cluster. In this context, the extant port management literature has not yet provided actionable and generally applicable conceptual guidance for PMBs towards achieving ambitious MS...
January 5th, 2022
PortStudies

The study reveals a need for increasing and differentiating the existing levels and standards of transparency in the governance of the port industry, and for greater consistency between ports within and across regions. The study concludes with a research agenda for future research. In their latest study, PortEconomics members Mary Brooks, Geraldine Knatz, Thanos Pallis and Gordon Wilmsmeier examine the concept of transparency as practised (or not) in ports. It explores the availability of information to the general public and port...
January 4th, 2022
PortStudies

Since the inception of China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in 2013, the associated infrastructure and transport and economic corridor developments have been widely addressed in the research field of transportation, logistics and supply chain management. Such developments open windows of opportunity for accommodating trade flows in new or upgraded intermediate hub nodes and gateway locations along the BRI corridors. In the latest port study, PortEconomics member Theo Notteboom joins Paul Tae-Woo Lee, Zhi-Hua Hu, and Sangjeong Lee, and...
December 3rd, 2021
PortStudies

The latest port study of PortEconomics members Giovanni Satta and Francesco Parola co-authored by Francesco Vitellaro and Nicoletta Buratti (University of Genoa) has a twofold research objective. First, it scrutinises the current state of the art concerning adopting the most popular social media by European port managing bodies (PMBs). Second, it investigates the use of social media in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication strategies of European PMBs. The portstudy carries out online field research on the use...
November 29th, 2021
PortStudies

The latest portstudy of PortEconomics members Francesco Parola, Giovanni Satta and Theo Notteboom along with Luca Persico (University of Genoa) contributes to the extant debate on port planning and development by analysing current approaches and challenges for academics and port authorities with respect to traffic forecasting. First, the authors examine how academics approach traffic forecasting in ports based on an extensive literature review. Next, using a sample of 28 core ports in the European Union, they provide empirical evidence...
November 15th, 2021
PortStudies

Like many communication systems, maritime networks are embedded in space. But the effects of spatial properties on the network itself have not been deeply examined in previous research. Gravitational properties affect international trade, as well as container shipping flows in general, as distance represents spatial friction to exchange; yet the ability of the network and of specific nodes and links to operating at different geographic ranges of connectivity remains unknown. The latest port study of PortEconomic member Cesar Ducruet...
October 28th, 2021
PortStudies

Since the inception of China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in 2013, the associated infrastructure and transport and economic corridor developments have been widely addressed in the research field of transportation, logistics, and supply chain management. Such developments open windows of opportunity for accommodating trade flows in new or upgraded intermediate hub nodes and gateway locations along the BRI corridors. The latest portstudy of PortEconomics co-director Theo Noteboom, co-authored by Paul Tae-Woo Lee (Zhejiang University,...
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